Triacylglycerols Triglycerides Are The Main Storage Forms Of Fatty Acids

The triacylglycerols (Figure 14-6) are esters of the tri-hydric alcohol glycerol and fatty acids. Mono- and di-acylglycerols wherein one or two fatty acids are esteri-fied with glycerol are also found in the tissues. These are of particular significance in the synthesis and hydrolysis of triacylglycerols.

Carbons 1 & 3 of Glycerol Are Not Identical

To number the carbon atoms of glycerol unambiguously, the -sn- (stereochemical numbering) system is used. It is important to realize that carbons 1 and 3 of glycerol are not identical when viewed in three dimensions (shown as a projection formula in Figure 14-7). Enzymes readily distinguish between them and are nearly always specific for one or the other carbon; eg, glycerol is always phosphorylated on sn-3 by glycerol kinase to give glycerol 3-phosphate and not glycerol 1-phosphate.

Trans form (elaidic acid)

Trans form (elaidic acid)

Cis form (oleic acid)

Figure 14-5. Geometric isomerism of A9, 18:1 fatty acids (oleic and elaidic acids).

Cis form (oleic acid)

COO-

Figure 14-5. Geometric isomerism of A9, 18:1 fatty acids (oleic and elaidic acids).

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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