Size Exclusion Chromatography

Size exclusion—or gel filtration—chromatography separates proteins based on their Stokes radius, the diameter of the sphere they occupy as they tumble in solution. The Stokes radius is a function of molecular mass and shape. A tumbling elongated protein occupies a larger volume than a spherical protein of the same mass. Size exclusion chromatography employs porous beads (Figure 4-2). The pores are analogous to indentations in a river bank. As objects move downstream, those that enter an indentation are retarded until they drift back into the main current. Similarly, proteins with Stokes radii too large to enter the pores (excluded proteins) remain in the flowing mobile phase and emerge before proteins that can enter the pores (included proteins).

Figure 4-1. Components of a simple liquid chromatography apparatus. R: Reservoir of mobile phase liquid, delivered either by gravity or using a pump. C: Glass or plastic column containing stationary phase. F: Fraction collector for collecting portions, called fractions, of the eluant liquid in separate test tubes.

Figure 4-1. Components of a simple liquid chromatography apparatus. R: Reservoir of mobile phase liquid, delivered either by gravity or using a pump. C: Glass or plastic column containing stationary phase. F: Fraction collector for collecting portions, called fractions, of the eluant liquid in separate test tubes.

Proteins thus emerge from a gel filtration column in descending order of their Stokes radii.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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