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G-actin

G-actin ir

F-actin

F-actin

Tropomyosin

Troponin

Tropomyosin

Troponin

35.5 nm

The assembled thin filament

Figure 49-3. Schematic representation of the thin filament, showing the spatial configuration of its three major protein components: actin, myosin, and tropomyosin. The upper panel shows individual molecules of G-actin. The middle panel shows actin monomers assembled into F-actin. Individual molecules of tropomyosin (two strands wound around one another) and of troponin (made up of its three subunits) are also shown. The lower panel shows the assembled thin filament, consisting of F-actin, tropomyosin, and the three subunits of troponin (TpC, TpI, and TpT).

35.5 nm

The assembled thin filament

Figure 49-3. Schematic representation of the thin filament, showing the spatial configuration of its three major protein components: actin, myosin, and tropomyosin. The upper panel shows individual molecules of G-actin. The middle panel shows actin monomers assembled into F-actin. Individual molecules of tropomyosin (two strands wound around one another) and of troponin (made up of its three subunits) are also shown. The lower panel shows the assembled thin filament, consisting of F-actin, tropomyosin, and the three subunits of troponin (TpC, TpI, and TpT).

ure 49-2). Thus, the arrays of interdigitating filaments must slide past one another during contraction. Cross-bridges that link thick and thin filaments at certain stages in the contraction cycle generate and sustain the tension. The tension developed during muscle contraction is proportionate to the filament overlap and to the number of cross-bridges. Each cross-bridge head is connected to the thick filament via a flexible fibrous segment that can bend outward from the thick filament. This flexible segment facilitates contact of the head with the thin filament when necessary but is also sufficiently pliant to be accommodated in the interfilament spacing.

Diabetes 2

Diabetes 2

Diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. Normally, your body converts sugars, starches and other foods into a form of sugar called glucose. Your body uses glucose for fuel. The cells receive the glucose through the bloodstream. They then use insulin a hormone made by the pancreas to absorb the glucose, convert it into energy, and either use it or store it for later use. Learn more...

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